Racist housing practices from the 1930s linked to hotter neighborhoods today

MEG ANDERSON / NPR – In cities around the country, if you want to understand the history of a neighborhood, you might want to do the same thing you’d do to measure human health: Check its temperature.

That’s what a group of researchers did, and they found that neighborhoods with higher temperatures were often the same ones subjected to discriminatory, race-based housing practices nearly a century ago.

In a study of 108 urban areas nationwide, the formerly redlined neighborhoods of nearly every city studied were hotter than the non-redlined neighborhoods, some by nearly 13 degrees …

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